Join us for a special morning tea

We would love you to join us at the Newstead Arts Hub for a morning tea on Sunday 23rd June at 11am.

We are re-launching our Friends of the Arts Hub.

We would love you to become a Friend again for 2019-20 and help support the development of the Arts Hub. In return we’ll run a special Friends event every year and you’ll be invited.

Come along and become part of our Friends. Or see one of our committee members on the desk on the day.

Or if you can’t make it and want to be a Friend, please send us an email with your name, email, address and phone number, and send a donation of $20 or more to our Arts Hub account. Or print the invitation & Friend’s form here.

BSB: 633000
Account No. 155603707
Account Name: Arts Hub.

Don’t forget to include your “Name + Friend” as the reference.

In a Different Light – Australian Native Flower Photographs in Ultraviolet Light

In a Different Light – Australian Native Flower Photographs in Ultraviolet Light … an exhibition by David Oldfield

Why would you want to take such photos in the first place? This sounds like the question “Why would you want to climb Mount Everest?” The answer is not the one given by British mountaineer George Mallory – “Because it’s there” but probably more “Because nobody else is doing that for Australian flowers”.

David Oldfield was bitten by the photo bug while at school in England long before digital cameras were available and learnt all about the wonders of darkroom work. These days you can get digital cameras modified by specialist companies so that you can take photos invisible to human eyes. There is a small band of photographers around the world who enjoy seeing what happens when you use cameras far beyond what they were designed to do.

Many flowers have dark patterns on their petals which are visible under Ultraviolet (UV) light but invisible to the naked human eye. Scientific studies of honeybee vision have shown that their eyes are sensitive to UV, blue and green light. It appears that the dark patterns visible in UV may assist pollinating insects, such as honeybees, to find the nectar or pollen on the flowers. Overseas UV photographers have reported the existence of dark “bulls-eye” patterns on yellow petals in their images.

David has found that Australian flowers show similar patterns, as you will see if you visit his exhibition at the Newstead Arts Hub between 1st and 23rd June, open every Saturday and Sunday 10 am to 4 pm. It will also be open on Queens Birthday Monday 11th June.

The official opening will be Saturday 1st of June at 2pm.